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Advice on camping in Europe

If you’ve been going camping for a few years, you might think you know everything there is to know.

But taking your tent overseas on a holiday in Europe is a totally different experience. If, like us you’ve taken advantage of some of the great offers on channel crossings in September, here are some top tips to help you have a great time camping abroad, courtesy of Camping Magazine.

1 PLAN YOUR FULL ROUTE
If you’ve got a long drive to your chosen destination ahead of you, make sure you plan your route in detail. It’s important this… not only do you need to know where you’re going, obviously, but also how long the drive will take, roads you might want to avoid and where you might make overnight stops. Check where any tolls are as well, so you don’t get any nasty surprises. For countries like Switzerland and Austria you need a motorway pass, which can be bought online in advance or at the border.

2 GET YOUR CAR ROAD-READY
Once you’ve got your route sorted, you’re good to hit the road. Well, almost… because before setting off you need to make sure your car is ready to drive abroad. As usual before any long trip, check tyre pressure and the oil, coolant and windscreen wash levels. Fit deflector stickers to your headlights so you don’t dazzle oncoming cars at night. Your car will also need GB sign – either a sticker or a logo on the number plate, although how this will apply post-Brexit isn’t yet clear. Other important equipment needed includes high-viz vests, warning triangles and breathalysers, but check the local requirements in all the countries you’re passing through, even if you’ll only be on their roads for a short distance.

3 PACK A SEPARATE BAG FOR OVERNIGHT STOPS
Rather than drag your main bag out the car every time you make an overnight stop – whether on a ferry or at a campsite or hotel – it’s a good idea to pack a separate overnight bag with a change of clothes and toiletries. You should also take a large shoulder bag or daypack for essential documents, camera, money etc.

4 USE MOTORWAY REST AREAS
If you’re used to UK motorway services, this might not sound like great advice, but think again. Most on the continent are a joy to use – some are simply picnic areas, but others have petrol stations, shops and excellent food outlets. Do bear in mind though you’ll need some local currency to use the loos at some stops.

5 BRING STRONG PEGS
When the ground on your tent pitch is baked hard and dry by the summer sun, you’ll need pegs capable of being driven into the ground without bending. Flimsy metal or plastic anchors just won’t cut it in these conditions. To secure your tent use heavy duty steel pegs that you can hammer firmly into the ground. And a footprint to go under the groundsheet will help protect it from damage.

6 CREATE SHADE
They say only mad dogs and Englishmen go out in the midday sun, but if you insist make sure you’ve got plenty of shade. If your tent has a built-in shelter, try to set it up so it provides protection from the sun at the hottest time of the day. If it doesn’t, consider investing in an extension or canopy.

7 PACK AN ELECTRIC ADAPTOR
Your blue UK electric hook-up cable will work on many sites in Europe but there are some, especially in France, where you’ll need an adaptor to plug in your electric gadgets. A mains tester is worth taking to check the mains polarity. If the tester shows reversed polarity, you’ll need another adaptor to correct it before using British appliances. Check the situation in advance – you can buy adaptors at camping shops at home and some sites will lend you one if you pay a deposit.

8 BRING THE RIGHT GAS
Calor Gas is not available in mainland Europe, so if that’s what you use for your cooker or barbecue make sure you bring enough from home to last for the length of your trip. Alternatively, use Campingaz, which is readily available across the Continent. Be aware of restrictions on taking gas onto ferries and Eurotunnel.

9 TAKE A WASH BOWL
For some reason, sink plugs seem to go missing on sites abroad all the time, so it makes sense to take your own washing up bowl. A collapsible bowl, like the one below from Kampa, are probably the best option for space-saving reasons. Bringing your own loo roll is also advisable.

Kampa Collapsible Washing Bowl with Straining Plug

10 PACK YOUR BUDGIE SMUGGLERS
When it’s hot, cooling off in the pool is bliss, but for reasons best known to themselves, many campsites on the continent insist that men must wear tight, budgie-smuggler style trunks rather than Bermuda shorts. So, make sure you take a pair with you or risk having to traipse round the shops looking for a pair. At some sites you also need to wear a swimming cap – you canusually pick these up locallyfor a couple of Euros.

11 HIRE A FRIDGE
Having a full-on fridge in your tent might sound crazy, but even the most powerful coolboxes struggle to work in extreme temperatures so it’s actually a very good idea if you want to store food and drink. And many sites will rent you a fridge during your stay so luckily you don’t have to lug your own across the continent! We’ve even seen sites where campers return every year and leave their fridge-freezer (and barbecue) in storage on the site ready for their next visit.

12 STOCK UP ON MOSQUITO REPELLENT/CREAM/CANDLES
Mosquito bites can ruin a foreign holiday, especially if they get infected, so you can never have too much spray and cream with you. Citronella candles can help keep the bugs at bay. If you do get bitten make sure you’ve got something to relieve the symptoms stashed in your first aid box.   

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